News | World News | Kim Jong-un says U.S. and North Korea must cease 'irritating and hostile military actions'

Kim Jong-un says U.S. and North Korea must cease 'irritating and hostile military actions'

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  • Kim made the statement following his historic summit with President Trump
  • His comment was reported by the Korean State News Agency
  • Kim has invited Trump to visit Pyongyang, according to state media report
  • North Korea reaffirmed its commitment 'to work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula' 
  • Report also says Trump offered 'security guarantees to the DPRK and lift sanctions against it'

By Geoff Earle, Deputy U.s. Political Editor and Francesca Chambers, White House Correspondent For Dailymail.com In Singapore

Published: 18:42 EDT, 12 June 2018 | Updated: 23:43 EDT, 12 June 2018

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North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un said it was 'urgent' for the U.S. and North Korea to cease 'irritating and hostile military actions against each other' during talks on Tuesday with U.S. President Donald Trump, according North Korea's state media. 

The statement, reported by North Korean state media and picked up by wire services, came after Trump and Kim signed a joint statement where North Korea reaffirmed its commitment 'to work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.'

The North Korean report gives Kim credit for raising the issue of U.S.-South Korean exercises, which Trump said he'd cease for the time being after his summit meeting with Kim.

It also addressed the controversial topic of sanctions – something that was not mentioned in a joint statement signed by both leaders.  

North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un (L) shakes hands with US President Donald Trump (R) after taking part in a signing ceremony at the end of their historic US-North Korea summit, at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore 
North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un (L) shakes hands with US President Donald Trump (R) after taking part in a signing ceremony at the end of their historic US-North Korea summit, at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore 

North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un (L) shakes hands with US President Donald Trump (R) after taking part in a signing ceremony at the end of their historic US-North Korea summit, at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore 

'Noting that the building of lasting and durable peace-keeping mechanism on the Korean Peninsula is of weighty significance in ensuring peace and security in the region and the rest of the world, [Kim] said that it is urgent to make bold decision on halting irritating and hostile military actions against each other,' according to the report. 

It went on to mention the 'security guarantees' that Trump said he offered Kim but declined to speak about in detail in interviews and at a subsequent news conference and sanctions relief that the U.S. president said would come 'at a certain point.'

'Expressing his understanding of it, Trump expressed his intention to halt the U.S.-south Korea joint military exercises, which the DPRK side regards as provocation, over a period of good-will dialogue between the DPRK and the U.S., offer security guarantees to the DPRK and lift sanctions against it along with advance in improving the mutual relationship through dialogue and negotiation,' the report claimed.

U.S. officials gave no indication that an immediate lifting of sanctions was on the table. 

In fact, Trump said Tuesday, 'The sanctions will come off when we are sure that the nukes are no longer a factor.' 

Trump said he hopes 'it’s going to be soon' and 'at a certain point, I actually look forward to taking them off.' 

In addition to denuclearization, Trump said that human rights abuses in North Korea would have to discontinue for sanctions to be lifted.

'I want significant improvement. I want to know that it won’t be happening,' he stated. 

North Korean media says that Trump and Kim addressed the controversial topic of sanctions – something that was not mentioned in a joint statement signed by both leaders
North Korean media says that Trump and Kim addressed the controversial topic of sanctions – something that was not mentioned in a joint statement signed by both leaders

North Korean media says that Trump and Kim addressed the controversial topic of sanctions – something that was not mentioned in a joint statement signed by both leaders

The report out of North Korea gave no indication of which meeting Trump allegedly said that sanctions would be lifted - a one-on-one or in a wider meeting with each side's advisors.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo took a tough line on sanctions in the hours before the historic meeting.

'If diplomacy doesn’t move in the right direction, sanctions will increase,' he stated.

After the summit, when Trump was being hit for giving North Korea too many giveaways, the president emphasized his ability to put additional sanctions on North Korea if it misbehaves. 

Trump told reporters he has 300 'powerful' punishing actions that he's prepared to unleash. 

He also acknowledged a commitment to security 'guarantees' for Kim that were mentioned and then brushed aside in the joint statement.

'Well, we’ve given him, I don’t wanna talk about it specifically, but we’ve given him, he’s going to be happy,' Trump said of the matter in an ABC News interview after the summit.

At a subsequent presser, Trump said he would be 'stopping the war games' in South Korea, 'which will save us a tremendous amount of money' in response to a question about the security assurances.

He reaffirmed his stance, however, that U.S. troops should remain deployed in region, saying, 'We’re not reducing anything.' 

The president that 'at some point' he'd like to bring home the troops that he said earlier this year he'd be recalling 'soon,' noting that he does 'want to get our soldiers out.'

'But that’s not part of the equation right now,' he said. ''At some point, I hope it will be, but not right now.'

A view of the newly developed intercontinental ballistic rocket Hwasong-15's test that was successfully launched is seen in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang November 30, 2017
A view of the newly developed intercontinental ballistic rocket Hwasong-15's test that was successfully launched is seen in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang November 30, 2017

A view of the newly developed intercontinental ballistic rocket Hwasong-15's test that was successfully launched is seen in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang November 30, 2017

North Korea's state media report said to achieve peace and stability 'and realize its denuclearization, the two countries should commit themselves to refraining from antagonizing with each other out of mutual understanding, and take legal and institutional steps to guarantee it.'

Kim said that in a Tuesday meeting that the North and the United States should commit to avoid antagonizing each other and take legal, institutional steps to guarantee it, a report by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said. 

According to Reuters, Kim told Trump that North Korea and the U.S. should commit to avoid antagonizing each other – and back it up with legal and institutional steps.  

Denuclearization is contingent on ceasing antagonism, Agence France Press reported hours after the conclusion of the historic summit with President Donald Trump.

The denuclearization plank also drew criticism for its failure to include tough language dealing with verification, inspections, limits on processing of Uranium, or destruction of weapons and ballistic missiles.

According to the North Koran report, Trump said he 'understood,' and promised to put a halt to joint U.S.-South Korean war games. 


President Trump said after the summit the U.S. would stop doing 'very provocative' military exercises
President Trump said after the summit the U.S. would stop doing 'very provocative' military exercises

President Trump said after the summit the U.S. would stop doing 'very provocative' military exercises

Trump said after the summit the U.S. would stop doing 'very provocative' military exercises, adopting the language of North Korean critics of the exercises, which U.S. military officials have testified are necessary to maintain readiness. 

Even the state-run KCNA report used more guarded language to describe the war games, calling them something 'the DPRK side regards as provocation.'

In another release, KCNA reported that Kim invited Trump to visit Pyongyang at a convenient time. Trump told reporters he might host Kim in the U.S. 

Trump stunned observers when he said the U.S. would cancel military exercizes held every year with South Korean allies. 

Washington and Seoul are security allies, with around 30,000 US troops stationed in the South to defend it from its neighbor, which invaded in 1950.

They hold joint military exercises every year that infuriate Pyongyang, which has long demanded an end to the drills and often responds with actions of its own, ratcheting up tensions.  

'We will be stopping the war games which will save us a tremendous amount of money,' President Trump said.  

'The war games are very expensive - we paid for a big majority of them, we fly in bombers from Guam.

A US Air Force B-1B Lancer, flanked by Republic of Korea Air Force F-15, dropping a 2,000 pound bomb during a joint US - South Korea drill 
A US Air Force B-1B Lancer, flanked by Republic of Korea Air Force F-15, dropping a 2,000 pound bomb during a joint US - South Korea drill 

A US Air Force B-1B Lancer, flanked by Republic of Korea Air Force F-15, dropping a 2,000 pound bomb during a joint US - South Korea drill 

US Air Force B-1B bombers, F-35B stealth fighter jets and South Korean F-15K fighter jets fly over the Korean Peninsula during a joint drill
US Air Force B-1B bombers, F-35B stealth fighter jets and South Korean F-15K fighter jets fly over the Korean Peninsula during a joint drill

US Air Force B-1B bombers, F-35B stealth fighter jets and South Korean F-15K fighter jets fly over the Korean Peninsula during a joint drill

'That's a long time for these big massive planes to be flying to South Korea to practice and then drop bombs all over the place and then go back to Guam. I know a lot about airplanes, it's very expensive. 

'It is inappropriate to have war games. I think it's very provocative.'

Trump said he hoped to remove U.S. troops from South Korea at some point.

'I want to get our soldiers out. I want to bring our soldiers back home. But that's not part of the equation right now. I hope it will be eventually.  

The president made similar comments to Fox News host Sean Hannity in an interview that aired in full on Tuesday evening East Coast time.

'One of the things that I’m very happy about, we’re not going to play the war games anymore, which, you know how expensive that is. We’re flying these massive bombers in for practice from Guam. I said, how far is Guam? Six and a half hours, sir. So, that’s a long way for a big bomber, times, you know,' Trump said. 

He told Hannity, 'We’re not going to be doing the war games as long as we’re negotiating in good faith. So, that’s good for a number of reasons, in addition to which we save a tremendous amount of money. 

'You know, those things, they cost. I hate to sound like -- appear a businessman, but I kept saying, what it’s costing? I would look at what coming in from the sea, and bombs exploding. I said, what does this cost? I didn’t even want to tell you, but it’s a lot,' the billionaire and former real estate mogul asserted.

Trump explicitly promised to back off the military exercises.

'So, we’re not going to be doing that, as long as we’re negotiating in good faith, which I think we will be,' he said.

 

 

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