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Red nose boycott after it's revealed only 65p of £1.25 goes to charity

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Parents BOYCOTT red noses after discovering only 65p of the £1.25 cost actually goes to Comic Relief - while others say buying the plastic bauble feels like 'killing the planet'

  • The 2019s red noses - made from foam and costing £1.25 - come in 11 designs
  • However, people are questioning on social media why only 65 pence goes to the actual charity - with many schools offering to paint red noses for £1 instead  
  • Others are concerned about the plastic waste, although the charity does offer to recycle them after the main fundraising day on Friday 15th March
  • Sir David Attenborough has encouraged schoolchildren to 'replace plastic products' with alternatives after they wrote to him about red nose concerns 

By Jo Tweedy For Mailonline

Published: 10:19 EDT, 14 March 2019 | Updated: 10:22 EDT, 14 March 2019

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The red nose has been synonymous with Comic Relief since the charity began in 1988 - but there's a growing online movement encouraging people not to buy the novelty.

After it was revealed that only 65 pence from each one bought - at a cost of £1.25 - actually goes to charity, many UK schools are opting to paint red noses on children for £1 to ensure more money is raised. 

Others have expressed concerns about the amount of plastic used in the foam noses - of which there are 11 designs this year - despite the charity upping its recycling efforts.

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Backlash: Comic Relief has faced growing anger from supporters over the continued use of plastic foam in its red noses, of which there are 11 designs this year (Pictured: Tess Daly and Claudia Winkleman sporting red noses during their recent dance-a-thon for the charity)
Backlash: Comic Relief has faced growing anger from supporters over the continued use of plastic foam in its red noses, of which there are 11 designs this year (Pictured: Tess Daly and Claudia Winkleman sporting red noses during their recent dance-a-thon for the charity)

Backlash: Comic Relief has faced growing anger from supporters over the continued use of plastic foam in its red noses, of which there are 11 designs this year (Pictured: Tess Daly and Claudia Winkleman sporting red noses during their recent dance-a-thon for the charity)

Some schools have said they'll ask parents to donate £1 for a painted nose after it was revealed that only 65 pence from each £1.25 sale reaches the charity
Some schools have said they'll ask parents to donate £1 for a painted nose after it was revealed that only 65 pence from each £1.25 sale reaches the charity

Some schools have said they'll ask parents to donate £1 for a painted nose after it was revealed that only 65 pence from each £1.25 sale reaches the charity

There are 11 'surprise' designs hidden in boxes for 2019, with Comic Relief encouraging supporters to keep the foam noses as keepsakes or for art projects
There are 11 'surprise' designs hidden in boxes for 2019, with Comic Relief encouraging supporters to keep the foam noses as keepsakes or for art projects

There are 11 'surprise' designs hidden in boxes for 2019, with Comic Relief encouraging supporters to keep the foam noses as keepsakes or for art projects

Concerns on social media about the amount the charity actually receives from the sale of its famous red noses have left some calling for people to boycott them.

@RobBeetweets wrote: 'So a red nose costs £1.25 and my daughters nose tells me 65p goes to comic relief. Cost of production must be 1p at most. Where does the rest go?'   

@BowyerKevan added: 'Why does only 65p of the £1.25 to purchase a Red Nose go to the appeal...? Also the noses are foam, so a constituent of plastic...in this day of plastic issues isn't it easier to donate £1.25 via Red Nose website then paint a Red Nose on your face..?? Just a thought...'  

The 11 designs come in a surprise box so supporters don't know which one they get until they open it. Two of the designs are rare to encourage people to keep their noses when red nose day has been and gone. 

However, there's a mounting backlash against the plastic used @RealTomH wrote: 'The anti-plastic backlash seems to have properly hit Red Nose Day this year. They’re going to need to rethink that.'  

Celebrities who tackled Kilimanjaro to raise funds for this year's Comic Relief throw their red noses in the air (Pictured on back row: Osi Umenyiora, Alexander Armstrong, Ed Balls and Dan Walker (front row left to right) Jade Thirlwall, Anita Rani, Leigh-Anne Pinnock, Shirley Ballas and Dani Dyer)
Celebrities who tackled Kilimanjaro to raise funds for this year's Comic Relief throw their red noses in the air (Pictured on back row: Osi Umenyiora, Alexander Armstrong, Ed Balls and Dan Walker (front row left to right) Jade Thirlwall, Anita Rani, Leigh-Anne Pinnock, Shirley Ballas and Dani Dyer)

Celebrities who tackled Kilimanjaro to raise funds for this year's Comic Relief throw their red noses in the air (Pictured on back row: Osi Umenyiora, Alexander Armstrong, Ed Balls and Dan Walker (front row left to right) Jade Thirlwall, Anita Rani, Leigh-Anne Pinnock, Shirley Ballas and Dani Dyer)

Enviromental campaigner Sir David Attenborough wrote to children at a Cornish school who questioned the use of red noses on Comic Relief day, saying they should try and replace plastic products where possible
Enviromental campaigner Sir David Attenborough wrote to children at a Cornish school who questioned the use of red noses on Comic Relief day, saying they should try and replace plastic products where possible

Enviromental campaigner Sir David Attenborough wrote to children at a Cornish school who questioned the use of red noses on Comic Relief day, saying they should try and replace plastic products where possible

@youknowitstru19 wrote: 'Don’t buy a Red Nose it’s plastic and harmful to the planet and an outdated idea. Donate for comic relief without these!'

Earlier this week, it was revealed that Sir David Attenborough had responded to a letter from pupils at Fourlanesend School, in Cornwall after they wrote to him saying that they would be using printed noses instead. 

Sir David, 92, said the children were right to question the use of plastic and encouraged them to replace 'plastic products' where possible. 

Comic Relief told MailOnline that only 65 pence from the sale of each red nose goes to charity because the rest is spent on 'production, shipping and distribution'. 

The charity clarified that official seller Sainsbury's 'does not make a profit from the sale of Red Nose Day merchandise or take any of the proceeds.'

And on the plastic issue, a spokesperson told MailOnline: 'We encourage re-use as much as possible. Red Noses, for example, are collectible toys, and we encourage customers to re-purpose their Nose – that may be for a fancy dress accessory, art project or a game. For those who don’t want to keep their Noses, Sainsbury’s offers the opportunity to bring them back into store to be recycled.' 

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